Posted tagged ‘stereoscopic 3D’

More games from the GTI Asia China Expo 2010

September 7, 2010

Newsfeed 920 via

We finally have an extensive look at what went on at the GTI Asia China Expo 2010 and along with plenty of games came a few surprises. I’m still trying to find any video posted from the event online but so far no luck – if anything substantial comes along I’ll update this post. Some of the games you’ll see below: the first non-glasses stereoscopic 3D arcade game, Disney’s 3D Ping Pong; Pentavision’s DJ MAx Technika 2; Dino Survivor 4D by Belrare; a new version of Konami’s Mocap Sports; Taito’s Gaia Attack 4; Hypaa’s Mozarc; Andamiro’s Pump It Up Fiesta; a 10-player game called Ocean Spirit 2 and much more than we had seen previously.

(more…)

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Namco releasing Deadstorm Pirates 3D(and 4D) next spring

September 4, 2010

It hasn’t been long since we heard about Namco filing for a number of patents which were involved with stereoscopic 3D technologies and now we have word about the first game which will take advantage of those patents, a stereoscopic 3D version of their shooter Deadstorm Pirates. No details beyond a spring release and the use of the 3D technology in both the non-motion and motion versions have been announced(making the latter a “4D” game) but it comes at a time where Japanese arcade manufacturers are ramping up the development of such games as a way to attract more customers into amusement facilities. Konami’s Road Fighters, which will be released this month in Japan, is also mentioned in the article and they reveal that the user can switch the 3D effect off if they wish.

As for the new Deadstorm Pirates, I hope that they take the opportunity to add more arcade-exclusive content to the game since the title is now available on the PS3.

Source: Pixus Wataru

Are Glasses-free 3D TV’s what the arcade industry needs?

August 24, 2010

The past few days have been a news desert for arcades and so far today isn’t looking any different although I did find some interest in this story about Toshiba’s development of a new TV set technology that finally allows the viewer to watch stereoscopic 3D content without the aid of glasses.

The 1st non-glasses 3D TV arcade game is already available

That is welcome news for anyone already on or looking to jump upon the 3D bandwagon but it also can be good news for arcades – once the price comes down.

How does this tie into arcades? Well despite the fact that some are completely ignoring recent developments in the arcade sector in the field of stereoscopic 3D, there has been plenty of that going on in many markets around the world. Before everyone started paying attention to 3D there were already a number of “4D rides” on the market that combined pop-out 3D with a motion game of some sort, whether it’s the XD Motion Theater, XRider or Trans-Force. The first game to use stereoscopic 3D without glasses was released this past May (Disney’s 3D Ping Pong); there is Star Predator; the recently announced Vulcan 4D; the revelation that Namco is researching a number of 3D technologies; and Konami has really been jumping into the 3D fray with Metal Gear Arcade, Road Fighters 3D and possibly the new Space Agent. When I was at Amusement Expo this year there was a little 3D talk going around at different companies so interest is there but the real problem has been the glasses barrier. A monitor which doesn’t require those and that has a good viewing angle (a problem with the Nintendo 3DS according to many reports) is what will be needed for the technology to really come through in the amusement sector but with the first Toshiba sets costing “several thousand dollars” it still will be a while for it  to hit arcades unless Toshiba’s technology can be licensed out for cheap (unlikely) or they can give arcade makers a killer deal (maybe convince Toshiba that it’s a great way to advertise their technology to the public to get special pricing).

Then there is the question: does the arcade industry need 3D to make a splash and grab attention? It’s not like it hasn’t been tried before (see SubRoc-3D and Continental Circuit 3D) but the same was said of 3D in the movies. Of course I still think that it remains to be seen whether people will continue to care about 3D in theaters as except for Avatar and Alice in Wonderland, nothing has made a big splash this summer because of 3D, although that can be attributed to the fact that the movies in 3D weren’t worth watching in 2D and many movies were processed in 3D after they were already filmed. It will be telling if TRON Legacy or the new Harry Potter can break through but those will probably coast on the fact that they have installed fanbases (I admit that I will go see TRON in 3D but it will be the first 3D movie I’ll have seen since Captain Eo at Disneyland many years ago). Getting back to arcades, it’s hard to judge stereoscopic technology so far as we know that the big 3D/4D simulators do really well but so far it remains to be seen with smaller, stand-alone units. With all of the talk that there has been about Metal Gear Arcade, I can’t recall anyone talking about the 3D effect as they focus on other aspects of the game (the glasses have been mentioned as they include head-tracking). We have no earnings or sales records on the titles that have already been released. I would like to see it happen with some games but it is most likely that once 3D becomes more available in arcades, we’ll have options between 2D and 3D TV cabinets to test the waters. As long as we don’t fall into to the trap that movies have been doing – thinking that tacking 3D on something mediocre or terrible will suddenly make it good. 3D should be used to enhance the experience that an already good game provides, not try and make up for it.

Are Glasses-free 3D TV's what the arcade industry needs?

August 24, 2010

The past few days have been a news desert for arcades and so far today isn’t looking any different although I did find some interest in this story about Toshiba’s development of a new TV set technology that finally allows the viewer to watch stereoscopic 3D content without the aid of glasses.

The 1st non-glasses 3D TV arcade game is already available

That is welcome news for anyone already on or looking to jump upon the 3D bandwagon but it also can be good news for arcades – once the price comes down.

How does this tie into arcades? Well despite the fact that some are completely ignoring recent developments in the arcade sector in the field of stereoscopic 3D, there has been plenty of that going on in many markets around the world. Before everyone started paying attention to 3D there were already a number of “4D rides” on the market that combined pop-out 3D with a motion game of some sort, whether it’s the XD Motion Theater, XRider or Trans-Force. The first game to use stereoscopic 3D without glasses was released this past May (Disney’s 3D Ping Pong); there is Star Predator; the recently announced Vulcan 4D; the revelation that Namco is researching a number of 3D technologies; and Konami has really been jumping into the 3D fray with Metal Gear Arcade, Road Fighters 3D and possibly the new Space Agent. When I was at Amusement Expo this year there was a little 3D talk going around at different companies so interest is there but the real problem has been the glasses barrier. A monitor which doesn’t require those and that has a good viewing angle (a problem with the Nintendo 3DS according to many reports) is what will be needed for the technology to really come through in the amusement sector but with the first Toshiba sets costing “several thousand dollars” it still will be a while for it  to hit arcades unless Toshiba’s technology can be licensed out for cheap (unlikely) or they can give arcade makers a killer deal (maybe convince Toshiba that it’s a great way to advertise their technology to the public to get special pricing).

Then there is the question: does the arcade industry need 3D to make a splash and grab attention? It’s not like it hasn’t been tried before (see SubRoc-3D and Continental Circuit 3D) but the same was said of 3D in the movies. Of course I still think that it remains to be seen whether people will continue to care about 3D in theaters as except for Avatar and Alice in Wonderland, nothing has made a big splash this summer because of 3D, although that can be attributed to the fact that the movies in 3D weren’t worth watching in 2D and many movies were processed in 3D after they were already filmed. It will be telling if TRON Legacy or the new Harry Potter can break through but those will probably coast on the fact that they have installed fanbases (I admit that I will go see TRON in 3D but it will be the first 3D movie I’ll have seen since Captain Eo at Disneyland many years ago). Getting back to arcades, it’s hard to judge stereoscopic technology so far as we know that the big 3D/4D simulators do really well but so far it remains to be seen with smaller, stand-alone units. With all of the talk that there has been about Metal Gear Arcade, I can’t recall anyone talking about the 3D effect as they focus on other aspects of the game (the glasses have been mentioned as they include head-tracking). We have no earnings or sales records on the titles that have already been released. I would like to see it happen with some games but it is most likely that once 3D becomes more available in arcades, we’ll have options between 2D and 3D TV cabinets to test the waters. As long as we don’t fall into to the trap that movies have been doing – thinking that tacking 3D on something mediocre or terrible will suddenly make it good. 3D should be used to enhance the experience that an already good game provides, not try and make up for it.

Yoony’s Vulcan 4D blasts it’s way to arcades

August 20, 2010

Newsfeed 905 via

Korean-based game maker Yoony Electronic’s amazed us with their massive Vulcan-M chain-gun coin-op game and they already have a sequel of sorts ready to go for the arcade market. Vulcan 4D retains the head-turning aspect of a rotating chain-gun for the controller but they’ve downgraded it from it’s smoke-spewing, shell ejecting big brother. Vulcan 4D makes use of a 3D pop-out effect that the player needs 3D glasses for, although you can’t see the 3D blur in the video below. I noticed the same thing when seeing pictures of another 3D projection game called Star Predator.

Other differences from Vulcan-M include a smaller cabinet and new software. Instead of a WW2-esque fixed turret shooter, now you traverse through caves and jungles shooting down hoards of bugs, bats, spiders, dinosaurs and pterosaurs. The game is no Primeval Hunt though as they all just come straight at you, if they get to close and attack then you can take damage. Graphically it’s nothing to write home about,  letting the chaingun and the 3D effect make up for appearances. Like Yoony’s other offerings, Vulcan 4D should be widely available internationally but the price point is unknown at this point.

Yoony also has a shooting gallery game called Carnival Land: Shooting Game but the software needs a bit of work. There is nothing wrong with simple games but they should require an actual challenge to be compelling.

Yoony's Vulcan 4D blasts it's way to arcades

August 20, 2010

Newsfeed 905 via

Korean-based game maker Yoony Electronic’s amazed us with their massive Vulcan-M chain-gun coin-op game and they already have a sequel of sorts ready to go for the arcade market. Vulcan 4D retains the head-turning aspect of a rotating chain-gun for the controller but they’ve downgraded it from it’s smoke-spewing, shell ejecting big brother. Vulcan 4D makes use of a 3D pop-out effect that the player needs 3D glasses for, although you can’t see the 3D blur in the video below. I noticed the same thing when seeing pictures of another 3D projection game called Star Predator.

Other differences from Vulcan-M include a smaller cabinet and new software. Instead of a WW2-esque fixed turret shooter, now you traverse through caves and jungles shooting down hoards of bugs, bats, spiders, dinosaurs and pterosaurs. The game is no Primeval Hunt though as they all just come straight at you, if they get to close and attack then you can take damage. Graphically it’s nothing to write home about,  letting the chaingun and the 3D effect make up for appearances. Like Yoony’s other offerings, Vulcan 4D should be widely available internationally but the price point is unknown at this point.

Yoony also has a shooting gallery game called Carnival Land: Shooting Game but the software needs a bit of work. There is nothing wrong with simple games but they should require an actual challenge to be compelling.

Namco patents reveal work on new stereoscopic and motion-sensing technologies

July 17, 2010

Motion sensing dance machine

AM Net this morning has linked to a document discussing some new patents that Namco has won and as always, with new patents comes the speculation as we ponder about new content which they could be working on.

According to the article, 28 patents total have been won in the following fields (bad translation is Google’s fault): “Technical field related to 9 Stereoscopic vision Toyama” (so work on 3D monitors, which Konami Japan has been pushing hard with titles like Metal Gear Arcade and Road Fighters 3D); “6 gaming technology utilizing motion-recognition technology” (motion-recognition doesn’t sound like motion bases but seems to imply technology along the lines of the Wii or Kinect); “3 game-related technology for network communication” (proprietary network setups like e-Amusement, ALL.Net or CoinUp is my guess); “4 technical areas related to how to work with game characters” (augmented reality in some form).

3D prize machine

After some searching around a link provided in the document,I found a page which lists the 28 patents Namco was awarded which you should be able to pull up here. I tried searching for Namco Bandai (using Japanese characters) in the advanced search and it came up with the patents talking about toys interacting with video game characters, toys that sense odors, a music game based upon player movement(pictured to the upper right),  the stereoscopic patents are listed numbers 19-27 on the page I link to above, with several the titles mentioning something about methods for stereoscopic birds-eye views(from one picture I found, it looks like they have developed a way to get the stereoscopic effect on a cocktail style cabinet – imagine that for Pac-Man Battle Royale!) and even a stereoscopic application with a prize machine(also pictured, click to enlarge). When we will see these technologies make their debut

3D screen for a cocktail cabinet

in arcades is anyone’s guess – sometimes patents are issued for a technology that never sees the light of day publicly or they use it for something else completely. Either way it’s safe to say that Namco is looking into stereoscopic 3D for their amusement content. At this rate I am thinking that 2011 will be the year of the stereoscopic game in arcades, with the technology finding it’s footing this year with titles like Disney’s 3D Ping Pong and Metal Gear Arcade. Of course, I think that will only be the case if they can produce screens which don’t require glasses and don’t require the player to stand in a very specific spot to get the effect right.