Posted tagged ‘distributor’

A little more help with opening your arcade and an update on my own

March 7, 2009

I know that there are a lot of you out there who would like to open an arcade but might not be sure where to start (you might also be scared out of your wits due to the way the economy has continued to slide downhill where we’ve been hoping that flushing trillions of our tax dollars down the toilet will magically fix the root of the problem). I have written extensively monkeysarcadesabout the subject in the past and one thing I have pointed out before that one place that can help you with research along with giving you an idea of what to buy will be a good distributor. Now it does pay to shop around as every company has their own deals and salespeople to deal with and we recently received an e-mail from a distributor known as Monkey’s Arcades who is extending a hand to those of you looking to get into this business. In particular you can contact Dave Gull there and see what they have to offer you as they have helped many people get their start in the arcade business. Thanks for sending that along to us Dave.

I also should take this opportunity to update all of you on my own status as of late. You might recall that I have been stuck between a rock and a hard place when it comes to my business since November of last year – it was then that I found out that the mall where I am currently located had plans on giving me the boot to make way for a new entrance and I was under the impression that I was going to be closed at the beginning of January, since that is what I was told. As it turned out they didn’t close me down in January but the possibility of

The new place - lots of cleaning, fixing, painting and carpeting to do still

The new place - lots of cleaning, fixing, painting and carpeting to do still

being closed any day continues to hang over my head, which makes it extremely difficult to take steps to keep my business healthy, such as through advertising. Why spend hundreds of dollars on advertising that I would be locked into for weeks on end when I could be shut down with only 24 hour notice? (Note: When you do a contract with a landlord, fight to get plenty of time in there where they have to notify you about eviction for whatever reason – that’s one lesson I have learned) So I have been focusing on free means of advertising as well as working on a new location. In the forums I have discussed my progress on a new location in a different city, where I will be partnering up with another arcade owner who has a lot of cool games and shares my attitude and vision towards the arcade industry. The only problem with the new place is that we still have an awful lot of work to do, although we have made great progress over the past two months from where we started. If things work out the way we are planning, we should be ready sometime next month and this time with more experience to jump off of, I will do things a little differently, such as in how I market to people.  It will be easier with a much larger location with an expanded game selection to do so but one thing we will certainly do is have a grand opening. With my current location I did a soft opening with a plan to do a grand opening later but unfortunately I procrastinated on that and by the time I was ready for it too much time had passed by. It also will be easier to hold parties since we will have a couple of party rooms, which is a big money maker for many arcades. At my current place there is no space to have a separate party room and so while we have offered to do parties, we haven’t had very many since we are not competitive in that arena. On top of that we’ll have a fully functional Sega R360 which

We're doing some maintenance on this beast

We're doing some maintenance on this beast

should be a cool attraction for players – it never hurts to have some sort of attraction to bring people in although the primary focus will still be on video arcade titles.  We will do a little bit more redemption on the side but that will not become the main attraction like with so many places. Of course if you want to make an arcade of your own where redemption is the big thing and arcades are the after-thought then that is fine, I’m not on a crusade against those kinds of places as they are proven to work. I admit that I have been pleased that I have been able to survive for almost a year here without a redemption center, although I do admit that if it weren’t for my PC LAN center it would have made life a bit more difficult in this particular location. I also should have finished all of my painting at the beginning which would have brightened up the place a bit but that’s another lesson I can take with me into the new place.

So I guess that is part of the message here – you probably will not get everything right with your first business but any failures you have the first time around will better prepare you for the next time where you can make it a bigger success. Of course it is also wise to change things up when you see that something is not working as opposed to standing firm in your mistaken way of handling business so that a small mistake doesn’t turn into a fatal one.

[Discuss on the Forum]

Incredible Technologies & Betson form an alliance

July 18, 2008

It’s hard to keep track on distributor/manufacturer relations sometimes and if you visit distributor websites you sometimes find that they carry products from one company but not another. It’s obviously in the best interest for manufacturers to get their product distributed through as many avenues as possible and it’s in the interest of the distributor to get as many different products in their line-up as possible.

In regards to that, Incredible Technologies and Betson have announced an alliance where they are teaming up to distribute IT products once again. To anyone out there who gets most of their product from Betson this is good news if you’re in the market for an IT game. Hit the post break for the press release.

[Incredible Technologies] [Betson] [Discuss on the Forum]

(more…)

Betson Open House proves successful in bringing attention to new games

April 22, 2008

[Via Betson Enterprises]

US Distributor Betson recently held an open house at their headquarters in Carlstadt, NJ and from their press release, it looks like it was a success. I think it’s a good idea for distributors to hold events like this from time to time – I know that some distributors allow the public to come into their showrooms at any time in the week, marketing an open house event like this is a great way to drum up some local attention for arcades and arcade games and let’s people come in and see that there are a number of great games coming out. At this particular Betson event they showcased similar titles to what was seen at ASI, including Big Buck Safari, Big Buck Hunter Pro Online, NASCAR Racing, Sea Wolf, Hollywood Reels and more. Hit the post break for the full press release or discuss it on the forums.

(more…)

IgroService – game manufacturer out of Russia

February 2, 2008

The Stinger Report has pointed us to the website for IgroService, a game manufacturer out of Russia that has a few arcade games among their products which seem to primarily focus on gambling devices. It is in question as to whether their arcade titleshotdrussia.jpg are being done legally – they have a strange cabinet design that features either House of the Dead and The Last Bounty Hunter; they have a dance machine called Dance+ that seems to fit Andamiro’s design although the cabinet is otherwise a bit different than what I’ve seen for Pump It up and it’s unknown as to how the actual game is (they state on the site thotrodder.jpghat it was designed by them so it’s possible that it is an original title but we need more details); One cabinet they feature is called Hot Rodder where it states that it uses a “SONY CD Plus system, the possibility to change programs” so that might be running a PS1 in an arcade cabinet; and finally they have a motorcycle game called Lightning Speed which features some interesting looking motorcycle controllers and LCD displays but they do not state if they made the actual game or not and the image islightningspeed.jpg too small to see if it’s something original or if it’s a bootleg of some other motorcycle game. They also have a couple of redemption games, including one crane title. If we can find out more we’ll post about it – it wasn’t long ago I remember an article going around the net that featured information on some old arcade games made in Soviet Russia that no one knew about until recently so it’s no surprise to see more arcade titles out of Russia today.

[IgroService webpage(scroll down to see the arcade titles)] [Discuss on the Forum]

Stinger Report – Can the Amusements Industry Eliminate the Distributor?

October 3, 2007

stinger-square12.jpg

The latest Stinger Report covers a touchy subject in the industry – should the distributor be eliminated? It’s not the first time I’ve heard of this subject being discussed as in the 2005 State of the Industry Report by Play Meter magazine had responses from operators about that very subject. What would the purpose be? To see if the industry as a whole could be more profitable. The theory is that by eliminating the distributor and buying directly from the manufacturer the operator could save money in an “eliminating the middle man” strategy. IT (makers of Golden Tee) attempted this already with some success but it is still far form the norm. Stinger looks at several factors that could lead to major changes within the arcade industry, including Just-In-Time Stocking (deployed in vending),  E-Payment and E-Distribution. Like any major change, something such as this takes time and in some cases doesn’t occur due to a number of reasons. Distributors have their advantages especially when it comes to understanding the region they are located in – my local distributor has been very helpful in getting me started with my arcade.

[The Stinger Report] [Discuss on the Forum]

Global VR Impresses Distributors at AMOA, one says ‘Don’t Buy from Namco or Sega’

October 2, 2007

Looks like GlobalVR has won some converts with it’s latest game NASCAR. So much so that one distributor in California has gone as far as writing a message on Coinoptoday.com that operators should avoid purchasing racing games from Namco and Sega (such as MaxiTune 3 and ID4) and instead spend that money on NASCAR in an effort to send them a message that prices need to come down. Some of this piece, by Brad Brown of WorldWide Video, has some strong words for the aforementioned companies but he does make some excellent points.

As many of you know, I am currently working on opening up my own arcade and I find myself agreeing with this opinion piece. I am by no means rich – in fact it’s been rather difficult ensuring that I have all of the funds in my personal account just so I can get a loan from the bank. Even then I am a bit below in funds from what I want to get started, but I’ll make do with what I have. Arcades are very expensive to get going and it’s pretty depressing when you look at how much you have to pay just to get one game. You almost wonder what it is you are really paying for because the chances of a decent ROI are near impossible. Take DDR for example. DDR Supernova from Konami runs for only $13,000. Chump change for operators, right? Maybe those who run Disneyland but not your typical street operator. Pump It up, a DDR clone runs for about half that price so if I purchase DDR , is it worth paying $7000 just for a name? Probably not. The same goes with Sega and Namco games – when Mario Kart came out, it was $9000. It still is expensive yet the hardware running the game is a slightly modified Gamecube. So unless that GC is made of solid gold, MK is grossly overpriced. I understand that it does take more work to make a high quality game, and thus it takes more money to so and with fewer games sold in the arcade industry than the console industry the advantage of bulk is lost but if a small company like GlobalVR is finding a way to bring prices down, there has to be a way for the big guys to do the same. I want nothing more than to offer great games like Afterburner, HotD4, Time Crisis 4 and more, but a small operator like myself can’t do that with a small amount of funds (just those three games bought together would run for nearly $30k, buying just the standard ‘cheap’ versions).

There was a time when arcade manfacturers were abhorred at the idea of selling a game at prices like we see today. Take for example The Last Starfighter by Atari. They canceled the game because it would have cost $10,000 to sell. Why did the arcade industry loose this mentality? Why do so many forces seem to attack the operator, from the government to manufacturers? Do we want this industry to survive or only exist in multi-million dollar facilities? As it says in the opinion piece “SEGA / NAMCO – It’s no use to keep up a business model that is strangling the coin op industry to death in a downward spiral as you have been doing since 1999.” He’s not the only one saying that too. Some are predicting that the coin op industry will be gone in 10 years. It doesn’t have to be that way but it will be if we don’t change our own industry. Gamers don’t like paying $2 for 60-90 seconds of fun – they would rather spend that on renting a game for their console at home. But operators don’t have much of a choice if the game cost them an arm and a leg. Make games with the quality you do now affordable to all operators and you will profit on your end and the industry will thrive.

UPDATE – Looks like the link below is no longer taking you to the article that we discussed. We are not sure why, but it is disappointing either way. Changes need to be made, prices need to come down and no one should be afraid to say so. I am not the only operator that believes in this (thanks for your e-mails, those of you who have sent them in), but I suppose change will only come when we speak with our dollars and not just with our mouths.

[Coinoptoday.com – WorldWide Video GlobalVR AMOA Report] [Discuss on the Forum]

Global VR Impresses Distributors at AMOA, one says 'Don't Buy from Namco or Sega'

October 2, 2007

Looks like GlobalVR has won some converts with it’s latest game NASCAR. So much so that one distributor in California has gone as far as writing a message on Coinoptoday.com that operators should avoid purchasing racing games from Namco and Sega (such as MaxiTune 3 and ID4) and instead spend that money on NASCAR in an effort to send them a message that prices need to come down. Some of this piece, by Brad Brown of WorldWide Video, has some strong words for the aforementioned companies but he does make some excellent points.

As many of you know, I am currently working on opening up my own arcade and I find myself agreeing with this opinion piece. I am by no means rich – in fact it’s been rather difficult ensuring that I have all of the funds in my personal account just so I can get a loan from the bank. Even then I am a bit below in funds from what I want to get started, but I’ll make do with what I have. Arcades are very expensive to get going and it’s pretty depressing when you look at how much you have to pay just to get one game. You almost wonder what it is you are really paying for because the chances of a decent ROI are near impossible. Take DDR for example. DDR Supernova from Konami runs for only $13,000. Chump change for operators, right? Maybe those who run Disneyland but not your typical street operator. Pump It up, a DDR clone runs for about half that price so if I purchase DDR , is it worth paying $7000 just for a name? Probably not. The same goes with Sega and Namco games – when Mario Kart came out, it was $9000. It still is expensive yet the hardware running the game is a slightly modified Gamecube. So unless that GC is made of solid gold, MK is grossly overpriced. I understand that it does take more work to make a high quality game, and thus it takes more money to so and with fewer games sold in the arcade industry than the console industry the advantage of bulk is lost but if a small company like GlobalVR is finding a way to bring prices down, there has to be a way for the big guys to do the same. I want nothing more than to offer great games like Afterburner, HotD4, Time Crisis 4 and more, but a small operator like myself can’t do that with a small amount of funds (just those three games bought together would run for nearly $30k, buying just the standard ‘cheap’ versions).

There was a time when arcade manfacturers were abhorred at the idea of selling a game at prices like we see today. Take for example The Last Starfighter by Atari. They canceled the game because it would have cost $10,000 to sell. Why did the arcade industry loose this mentality? Why do so many forces seem to attack the operator, from the government to manufacturers? Do we want this industry to survive or only exist in multi-million dollar facilities? As it says in the opinion piece “SEGA / NAMCO – It’s no use to keep up a business model that is strangling the coin op industry to death in a downward spiral as you have been doing since 1999.” He’s not the only one saying that too. Some are predicting that the coin op industry will be gone in 10 years. It doesn’t have to be that way but it will be if we don’t change our own industry. Gamers don’t like paying $2 for 60-90 seconds of fun – they would rather spend that on renting a game for their console at home. But operators don’t have much of a choice if the game cost them an arm and a leg. Make games with the quality you do now affordable to all operators and you will profit on your end and the industry will thrive.

UPDATE – Looks like the link below is no longer taking you to the article that we discussed. We are not sure why, but it is disappointing either way. Changes need to be made, prices need to come down and no one should be afraid to say so. I am not the only operator that believes in this (thanks for your e-mails, those of you who have sent them in), but I suppose change will only come when we speak with our dollars and not just with our mouths.

[Coinoptoday.com – WorldWide Video GlobalVR AMOA Report] [Discuss on the Forum]