Posted tagged ‘Arcade Hardware’

The new Vewlix F

June 27, 2010

Newsfeed 847 via

The cabinet above is the new Vewlix F. Can’t tell the difference between that and the standard Vewlix? That’s because there almost isn’t any. According to the information provided by the manufacturer, Hori, this new Vewlix is “almost identical” to Taito’s Vewlix except that this has some different “maintenance parts”. For 498,000¥ (about $5,500USD) it doesn’t seem like the changes really affect the price, especially for a cabinet without a board but it’s got the Vewlix name so you know you’re getting quality for that much at the very least.

UPDATE: Thanks for Fubarduck int he comments for clearing up a few things about this. It’s actually a more expensive version of the original Taito cabinet, it appears that all they have added is the ability to connect a console to this unit but for an extra, hefty price.

[Via Hori.jp]

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Another 10th anniversary to remember – the NAOMI

September 10, 2009

naomi

While I missed yesterday’s celebrations around the net for the 10th anniversary of Sega’s Dreamcast console, Kevin Williams sends us a reminder of another 10th Sega-related and Dreamcast-related anniversary – the Sega NAOMI. I personally haven’t had the chance to own a NAOMI machine for myself (yet) but it’s impact on the arcade industry is a noticeable one. Kevin writes in the latest Stinger Report:

“…2009 also marks a number of anniversaries linked to popular racing, one of the most popular being SEGA’s ‘Daytona USA’ which celebrates its 15th anniversary this year.

Meanwhile SEGA also sees their NAOMI Universal Cabinet cabinets – running third party titles – celebrating its own 10th anniversary (and still in use). This decade of success shows that while the SEGA R&D worked hard on the low-cost RingWide, the thirst for the old NAOMI architecture remained no matter how hard SEGA tried to quench it.

The NAOMI (New Arcade Operation Machine Idea) architecture was a major move by SEGA towards what we now see as the combined video amusement and console strategy. First demonstrated at the 1998 AM-Show, the system was presented as the successor to the Model 3, with a slew of titles in development, the amusement-variant of the Dreamcast console system. The platform would see over 60 amusement titles launched – and still counting.

The platform is still in 2009 a viable platform for a host of amusement studios, and at this years’ AM-Show we will see at least two third-party titles using the NAOMI. While the consumer games media celebrates the Dreamcast’s anniversary, the NAOMI will be overlooked, while the console only managed over 10.6 million sales the NAOMI would go on to beat this, many unsold Dreamcast going on to be cannibalized to become amusement platforms.

Finally, in a personal observation, KWP (owner of the Stinger Report) has a very strong soft spot for the NAOMI – and a possible ‘what if’ that it represented. At the time of the NAOMI launch SEGA showed the VMU (Visual Memory Unit) – and promised that this would be used as a smart storage device, and mini game system – not just for the Dreamcast – but also for the NAOMI. Though in reality only two prototype AM releases would be developed incorporating a connection for the mini LCD storage device, the idea still holds strong, and in its failed development the seeds of the ALL.Net were born.” – Kevin

I would post a poll asking about what your favorite NAOMI based game is but as we all know, there are an awful lot of games on that list so instead, just tell us in the comments section!

[Discuss on the Forums]

An overview of the Delta 32 cabinet

June 7, 2009

newstingerlogo

It has been a while since I first heard about the Delta 32 cabinet but at AOU, exhibitors were proud to show it off. Arcade cabinet production is certainly quite varied in Japan and these Delta 32 cabs are quite impressive for their quality although I am not sure how much they cost. It’s really nice how easily the monitor changes positions and if you’re a shmup fan or owner then this is a great cab to go with.

[Discuss on the Forums]

New Cyberdiver website also reveals new Taito arcade hardware

May 24, 2009

genesys

Taito has updated the website for their upcoming FPS arcade game Cyber Diver and along with a few more details on the game itself they also mention some new hardware that the game will be running on that they are called Genesys. The original announcement for the game did make a mention about “new hardware” although at the time it was not given a name. Even with this revelation there are no details on what Taito will pack into the hardware although the website does include a couple of pictures from the new game which uses the hardware, which you can see in better detail by clicking on the thumbnails below. Note that the pics below are semi-transparent and show some stuff from the website background which is why you’ll see some extra blue stuff in there. So far the game seems to have a little bit of a “Portal” edge to it with the blue-white devices but other than that it seems to be in a place all by itself with the design. Cyberdiver kits will be released later this year and will be used to update Half-Life 2 Survivor arcade cabinets in Japan. It was rare to find HL2 in arcades outside of Japan so we might not see Cyberdiver but we certainly should start seeing the Genesys if Taito decides to replace the Type X2 with it.

cyberdivergfx1 cyberdivergfx2 cyberdivergirl

[Cyberdiver website]

Sega reveals specs on it’s new arcade hardware, RingEdge and RingWide

February 20, 2009

ringedge

(image via AM-Net)

The hardware which caused some to erroneously think that Sega was jumping back into the console business has been revealed and we now see that there are actually two configurations, thus the use of the two different names. Not surprisingly, the hardware is PC-based, just like Lindbergh and Europa-R. But how does it stack up? Check it out:

Ringedge:

Intel Pentium E2160 CPU @ 1.8 GHz

1GB of DDR2 PC2-6400 RAM

An “nVidia GPU” w/ 384MB of GDDR3 RAM and supports Shader Model 4.0 and “two 1920×1200” which probably means it has ports for two monitors and can support up to that resolution. Also as of a note, it says “nVidia GPU 2” on the document up higher – not sure if that means

5.1 ch HD Audio

Onboard Gigabit LAN

A 32GB SSD drive for storage (finally, flash storage instead of a standard HDD which will likely fail soon)

Microsoft Windows Embedded Standard 2009

ALL.Net

Ringwide:

An Intel Celeron 440 @ 2 GHz

1GB of DDR2 PC5300 RAM

“AMD GPU” with 128MB of GDDR3 RAM, supports Shader Model 4.0 and also has two ports to handle 1920×1200 resolution video

5.1 ch HD Audio

Onboard gigabit LAN

An 8GB Compact Flash for storage

Microsoft Windows Embedded Standard 2009

ALL.Net

So there you have it! Ringwide is obviously not as powerful as Ringedge and thus should cost less – which is the point. Ringedge will be for games that Sega wants to push the envelope, Ringwide for games that won’t be as graphically pleasing but at the very least a little more inexpensive for arcade operators.  It also has been revealed that Border Break is among the first games to use Ring Edge, stay tuned for details on that in a moment.

Once again, I cannot stress enough that  Ringedge and Ringwide are NOT new game consoles. There seems to be a small effort online to convince people that RingWide is for arcades and RingEdge is some mythical new system but that is simply not the case. You can see a list of arcade titles which use both hardware configurations below. The specs, the pictures and the official word from Sega makes it very obvious that this is arcade hardware, as the design of the case looks somewhat similar to their arcade hardware called Lindbergh. The launch of the Lindbergh was similar to RingEdge/RingWide but to this day, Sega has not developed that into a console. The existence of patents for controllers is not an indication that they will turn this into a game console as they can use new control methods in the arcade – case in point, Border Break the first RingEdge game, uses a unique joystick/mouse control method that is seldom seen in arcades.

Sega has also pointed out their plans for RingEdge/RingWide in plans for arcades through 2010 and beyond. Talk of connectivity through ALL.NET is solely for arcades, which still lack many online titles. With Sega’s upcoming Sega Card Gen MLB game, it features online connectivity, the first game to do so by Sega in quite a while in US arcades. Hardware for Sega Card Gen hasn’t been confirmed yet but it fits into the RingEdge/RingWide plan and this is very exclusive to arcades.

I know that won’t stop fans from hoping for a new Sega console but at the moment, and I’m not trying to rain on anyone’s parade but there is an uptick of misinformation being put out there on the internet (which isn’t unusual in and of itself) regarding this hardware. I have talked directly with several reps at Sega about the rumors and they have stated very directly that these are simply arcade boards. I know that there are bloggers out there claiming to talk to Sega reps who supposedly “confirm” that Ringedge will be a console but if that is the case then it’s the first time a game company has decided to reveal a multi-billion dollar investment of their business to anonymous people who run random Sega fan blogs. I highly doubt that such would be their strategy in a business that is as competitive and risky as the console hardware realm, which is being dominated by the Nintendo Wii.

There are several games already available in arcades using the hardware spoken of here, as you can see below.

Current games using the hardware in arcades, some of which are already available in different areas of the world:

RingEdge

Border Break; Shining Force Cross; Project Diva Arcade; Let’s Go Island

Ringwide

Sega Racing Classic; Tetris: The Grandmaster 4; Melty Blood Actress Again Current Code; possibly Tetris Giant.

[Ringedge document via AM-Net] [Discuss on the Forum]

Sega reveals specs on it's new arcade hardware, RingEdge and RingWide

February 20, 2009

ringedge

(image via AM-Net)

The hardware which caused some to erroneously think that Sega was jumping back into the console business has been revealed and we now see that there are actually two configurations, thus the use of the two different names. Not surprisingly, the hardware is PC-based, just like Lindbergh and Europa-R. But how does it stack up? Check it out:

Ringedge:

Intel Pentium E2160 CPU @ 1.8 GHz

1GB of DDR2 PC2-6400 RAM

An “nVidia GPU” w/ 384MB of GDDR3 RAM and supports Shader Model 4.0 and “two 1920×1200” which probably means it has ports for two monitors and can support up to that resolution. Also as of a note, it says “nVidia GPU 2” on the document up higher – not sure if that means

5.1 ch HD Audio

Onboard Gigabit LAN

A 32GB SSD drive for storage (finally, flash storage instead of a standard HDD which will likely fail soon)

Microsoft Windows Embedded Standard 2009

ALL.Net

Ringwide:

An Intel Celeron 440 @ 2 GHz

1GB of DDR2 PC5300 RAM

“AMD GPU” with 128MB of GDDR3 RAM, supports Shader Model 4.0 and also has two ports to handle 1920×1200 resolution video

5.1 ch HD Audio

Onboard gigabit LAN

An 8GB Compact Flash for storage

Microsoft Windows Embedded Standard 2009

ALL.Net

So there you have it! Ringwide is obviously not as powerful as Ringedge and thus should cost less – which is the point. Ringedge will be for games that Sega wants to push the envelope, Ringwide for games that won’t be as graphically pleasing but at the very least a little more inexpensive for arcade operators.  It also has been revealed that Border Break is among the first games to use Ring Edge, stay tuned for details on that in a moment.

Once again, I cannot stress enough that  Ringedge and Ringwide are NOT new game consoles. There seems to be a small effort online to convince people that RingWide is for arcades and RingEdge is some mythical new system but that is simply not the case. You can see a list of arcade titles which use both hardware configurations below. The specs, the pictures and the official word from Sega makes it very obvious that this is arcade hardware, as the design of the case looks somewhat similar to their arcade hardware called Lindbergh. The launch of the Lindbergh was similar to RingEdge/RingWide but to this day, Sega has not developed that into a console. The existence of patents for controllers is not an indication that they will turn this into a game console as they can use new control methods in the arcade – case in point, Border Break the first RingEdge game, uses a unique joystick/mouse control method that is seldom seen in arcades.

Sega has also pointed out their plans for RingEdge/RingWide in plans for arcades through 2010 and beyond. Talk of connectivity through ALL.NET is solely for arcades, which still lack many online titles. With Sega’s upcoming Sega Card Gen MLB game, it features online connectivity, the first game to do so by Sega in quite a while in US arcades. Hardware for Sega Card Gen hasn’t been confirmed yet but it fits into the RingEdge/RingWide plan and this is very exclusive to arcades.

I know that won’t stop fans from hoping for a new Sega console but at the moment, and I’m not trying to rain on anyone’s parade but there is an uptick of misinformation being put out there on the internet (which isn’t unusual in and of itself) regarding this hardware. I have talked directly with several reps at Sega about the rumors and they have stated very directly that these are simply arcade boards. I know that there are bloggers out there claiming to talk to Sega reps who supposedly “confirm” that Ringedge will be a console but if that is the case then it’s the first time a game company has decided to reveal a multi-billion dollar investment of their business to anonymous people who run random Sega fan blogs. I highly doubt that such would be their strategy in a business that is as competitive and risky as the console hardware realm, which is being dominated by the Nintendo Wii.

There are several games already available in arcades using the hardware spoken of here, as you can see below.

Current games using the hardware in arcades, some of which are already available in different areas of the world:

RingEdge

Border Break; Shining Force Cross; Project Diva Arcade; Let’s Go Island

Ringwide

Sega Racing Classic; Tetris: The Grandmaster 4; Melty Blood Actress Again Current Code; possibly Tetris Giant.

[Ringedge document via AM-Net] [Discuss on the Forum]

Exclusive pics of the Tatsunoko Vs. Capcom hardware – Wii it is!

December 27, 2008

stinger11

There has still been some speculation as to what hardware the new Capcom fighter, Tatsunoko Vs Capcom is running on – while some sources stuck firm to the claim of it running on Wii-based hardware, others have stuck with it being something more along the lines of System 256 (which is PS2 based) or similar. Well now we have proof that T Vs. C is running on Wii-based hardware, thanks to these exclusive images that were sent to us by The Stinger Report. Many thanks to them and enjoy!

The first on the left is the T Vs. C hardware in it’s standard case. The second is that same thing but open, the third is what the home Wii hardware looks like when open. While the boards are obviously different in overall design, notice the Nintendo logo in the upper right hand corner of the board on the T Vs C board. It’s interesting to note that the T Vs C hardware includes a WiFi device and no wired ethernet port. One question now is how many other games will they use for this hardware? I think of the TriForce Gamecube-based hardware and that had very little support overall so will developers in Japan take to this as a cheap alternative to something like the Taito TypeX2?  We’ll only know as next year unfolds.

Click on the thumbnails below to see the hardware in full size.

cimg0201  cimg0206  wiihrdwre1

[Discuss on the Forum]