Posted tagged ‘accessibility’

New pixel art Coin-Op Posters for charity are pretty cool + Pac-Man in Vegas pic

March 25, 2010

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Thanks to for the news

Art and arcades have always gone together in some form and while this story doesn’t have anything to do with sideart, it does have something to do with arcades being portrayed in art and for a good cause.

This artwork, done by Gary Lucken, features eleven different cabinets drawn in “pixel art” style and you can pick up a poster (for the game room, arcade or just because) for $25. The proceeds goes to a charity that works as follows:

SpecialEffect is a charity dedicated to helping ALL young people with disabilities to enjoy computer games. For these children, the majority of computer games are simply too quick or too difficult to play, and we can help them and their parents to find out which games they CAN play, and how to adapt those games that they can’t.

The go-between the artist and the charity is the Poster Cause Project. We’ve actually covered a few instances before of arcade titles that have specific functions for helping disabled gamers play, such as this article discussing efforts in the 70′s to make arcade games more accessible; to modern functions found particularly in racing games from Rush 2049 to a modified version of MaxiTune 3 so players in wheelchairs could easily play.

Find out more at The Poster Cause Project

[Via GameSet Watch]

Also as a little follow-up to Amusement Expo on something that is sort of art related, Namco was handing out a bunch of Pac-Man Mardi Gras Beads and the necklaces turned up in places on the strip outside of the show. Might be considered NSFW so it’s after the break.

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Article: A Brief History of Video Game Accessibility in the 1970′s

May 28, 2009

[Thanks to Barrie at OneSwitchGaming for the tip]

When it comes down to what sets arcade games apart from video games in other areas of the spectrum, the controls certainly stand out as a key feature. Developers have come up with some revolutionary designs over the years and many times it’s the controls that bring the “true” arcade experience, even in classic gaming (take QBert for example – as simple as the footcontrolscontrols were for that, you never had a diagonal control quite like it at home). The controls are important to every single person who approaches the game and something to complex can turn some people away or it can even prevent them from playing, as might be the case with players who have a disability of some form. Arcades have been able to provide disabled players with the opportunity to experience gaming in many forms over the years and in case you are curious to know some of the history on that then below is a link to an article that discusses the history of video game accessibility in the 1970′s, which naturally includes a number of arcade games like Atari’s Touch Me or SteepleChase (the latter of which I will have at my new arcade location and it is an absolute blast to play, in part due to it’s simplicity). It is a very interesting article that also includes some non-arcade one-switch solutions but it only goes through the 70′s so perhaps we will have to wait to see what else they dig up beyond that.

[A Brief History of Video Game Accessibility in the 1970's - AbleGamers]

Article: A Brief History of Video Game Accessibility in the 1970's

May 28, 2009

[Thanks to Barrie at OneSwitchGaming for the tip]

When it comes down to what sets arcade games apart from video games in other areas of the spectrum, the controls certainly stand out as a key feature. Developers have come up with some revolutionary designs over the years and many times it’s the controls that bring the “true” arcade experience, even in classic gaming (take QBert for example – as simple as the footcontrolscontrols were for that, you never had a diagonal control quite like it at home). The controls are important to every single person who approaches the game and something to complex can turn some people away or it can even prevent them from playing, as might be the case with players who have a disability of some form. Arcades have been able to provide disabled players with the opportunity to experience gaming in many forms over the years and in case you are curious to know some of the history on that then below is a link to an article that discusses the history of video game accessibility in the 1970′s, which naturally includes a number of arcade games like Atari’s Touch Me or SteepleChase (the latter of which I will have at my new arcade location and it is an absolute blast to play, in part due to it’s simplicity). It is a very interesting article that also includes some non-arcade one-switch solutions but it only goes through the 70′s so perhaps we will have to wait to see what else they dig up beyond that.

[A Brief History of Video Game Accessibility in the 1970's - AbleGamers]


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