Archive for the ‘Video’ category

Adventureland premiering at the Sundance Film Festival

January 17, 2009

adventureland

stinger11

The one of the several things I can enjoy about the Sundance Film Festival currently going on in Park City Utah is that it’s close by to me. Unfortunately, I missed the last arcade related film shown at the festival (which I think was the King of Kong) but if I am lucky, I will get a chance to go up and see Adventureland, a coming of age film where a recent college grad gets a low paying job at an amusement park. It’s based upon the real-life experiences of the writer/director of the movie, Greg Mattola (director of Superbad) and it premieres in a few days. I have a friend up at the festival right now and he’s going to find out when it premieres so perhaps I’ll be able to post a review of the film on here in a few days.

To find out more, along with a preview clip showing some sweet 80’s games, hit the link below.

[Adventureland – Slashfilm] [Discuss on the Forum]

Stop Fighter 2

January 10, 2009

Stop motion animation is a real pain in the butt to pull off. I guess that is why so many of these kind of films are done with simple things like Legos. The following video doesn’t use legos fortunately, eschewing that for SF2 toys. It’s a first effort thing it seems so don’t expect it to reach Robot Chicken quality but it is somewhat amusing to watch Guile, Ken and Balrog duke it out. The makers of the video are also holding a contest for you to win a SF IV TE Fight Stick for the upcoming SFIV console release, which you can read more about at the link below.

Also be advised that it does contain some profanity, just a warning in advance.

[Via Pushing Play] [Discuss on the Forum]

Video of KOFXII Japanese location test

December 22, 2008

All I can say is man this game looks beautiful. I don’t care if it doesn’t use 3D, in fact I appreciate the 2D art (and game style when it comes to fighters) much more. The video speaks for itself below, uploaded by youtube user wx1682

Three more videos from IAAPA with some arcade game footage

December 4, 2008

While I had hoped for more videos of video arcades in action at IAAPA, I suppose that might have been hoping for too much since there is a lot more there than just arcades. But in this series of vids from the IAAPA floor you get to see several brief snippets of arcades in action in between all of the other stuff. Some games you see in these particular videos (albiet briefly) include NFS: Carbon, Razing Storm, Battle Stations, Sea Wolf, Rambo, Sega Rally 3, Nicktoons Nitro, Go Go Jockey, etc.

Part One

Part Two – most of the arcades you’ll see are in this video

Part Three

Videos taken and posted by youtube user HawTian

[Discuss on the Forum]

Arcade Hunters check out Tokyo Game Action

September 18, 2008

The guys from PressStartComic.com have made many arcade-related videos over the past little while and I realyl like their latest idea – “Arcade Hunters” where they go around and tour arcades. It’s a great way to help some arcades get attention and in the first episode they visit an arcade that we have discussed here before – Tokyo Game Action. I would post the videos to the blog here but the particular video site they use is not yet supported by WordPress. So here are direct links from part 1 to 6. Enjoy!

Arcade Hunters – Tokyo Game Action: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6

[Discuss on the Forum]

Say hello to Friction – a new arcade company and a new game UPDATED

September 10, 2008

AMOA is here and with it plenty new stuff to talk about. But today we don’t have just any news to talk about – it’s not every day we get to introduce to you a new company that is joining the fray of the arcade industry!

The name to remember – Friction Game Studios. Based in Los Angeles California, they have been working for some time on their first game known as Friction and soon you’ll be able to see it for yourself, either as an operator or a player.

Friction itself is a light-gun title where the gameplay looks to fit between Area 51 and F.E.A.R. (one the game’s designers is a fan of the latter). You play through three huge levels where you fight against hordes of robotic foes and on top of that there is plenty of destruction you can wreak on the game environment, with many breakable objects (ok, buzzword time: it has “destructible environments”)  and several types of weapons for you to use. From the official website about the game, here are all the features:

  • Real-time dynamic lighting using programmable pixel shaders
  • Fully destructible level geometry
  • Ultra-realistic physics and motion captured character animations
  • Over 14 different enemies with varied attack behaviors
  • Variety of player weapons and powerups
  • Unique transforming super bosses with special attacks

As you can see from the video and screencaps below the graphics are pretty good (much better in person and on top of that the game upscales it’s resolution depending on the monitor), as in addition to the physics involved it also uses specular lighting effects. It’s more impressive when you think about the fact that this has been put together by a small team (of I believe two people sorry, I misspoke there – the company has two founders) as opposed to a team with hundreds of people.

(Click on the images to expand them)

The game’s configuration for cabinet or kit form is still TBD, their preference is to go with a full cabinet. No word on pricing or exact specifications on the hardware yet (they are not ready to reveal that at the moment) but it is sufficient to say that this should be something great for operators to add to their arsenal.

Here is a video of the game in action. There are a couple more videos on their website:

We can expect to see more from Friction Game Studios in the future, so stay tuned and we welcome them to the fold!

[Friction Game Studios Website] [Discuss on the Forums]

On test: Pump It Up Jump!

August 16, 2008

Thanks to IcePagoda for the tip!

Andamiro is testing out a new version of Pump It up in Vancouver Washington, called Pump It Up Jump!, a dancing game for kids, as you can see by the design and size of the game. Apparently they have replaced arrows with apples and palm prints and the difficulty is quite easy from the looks of it as well. One thing I am surprised about is that I haven’t heard of a test in Asia of this game where I would have expected to have seen this first. Check out the video below, posted by youtube user Kyrandian573

[Discuss on the Forum]

Video Review: Oriental Legend 2

July 30, 2008

Sorry about the lack of video reviews lately, I have been busy working on the PCs at my arcade along with trying to fix a number of problems the arcades have been having (my HOTD4 has been giving me trouble which is why I haven’t done a video of it yet; I also am working on installing Street Fighter 2: Hyper Fighting but it’s having issues with the kick buttons but there is more going on to keep me stressed). But I did manage to record something on our import game, Oriental Legend 2 the other day. Since I installed the card reader it has been receiving more attention than it did before, which I find interesting as many arcade locations in the US typically shun card readers. The video would be in HD but thanks to Vimeo turning into anti-gaming morons we can’t have game videos uploaded to that site anymore so youtube for now.

[Discuss on the Forum]

SFIV & "The Battle of Destiny: Road to Evolution" Tournament in the UK

July 27, 2008

A big tournament, known as The Battle Of Destiny: Road to Evolution (the title almost sounds like something from an old rock album) recently took place in the UK, and The Stinger Report was there to scope out how things went. From The Stinger:

The UK Capital played host to what must be the largest gathering of Street Fighter IV machines seen outside of Japan.

At the ‘Battle of Destiny: Road to Evolution’ – the first organized event of its kind, held at the London Metropolitan University student halls.

The whole event organized by the Neo Empire team [Image 0162], the number one fighting games community. Established in 2005 the community has proven a strong ‘Play-Power’ community able in this case to move mountains.

Beyond the showing of the SFIV machines, a large number of console machines were in operation playing the latest and greatest fighting games. This major tournament was held linked with a number of championship play offs, with the winner sent to the EVO2008 Championship series in Las Vegas

The main event for The Stinger however was the appearance of the Street Fighter machines. The event supported by Capcom Europe, and by their PR Manager Leo Tan [Image 313]. To date only a small band of UK media had seen two SFIV machines that had been based in a locked room at Capcom’s London HQ – now the players had their chance.

For the first time for the UK playing public six Street Fighter IV cabinets where placed on free-play for a hoard of eager fingers. Hot-off the boat the ‘Vewlix’ cabinets running the Taito Type-X² architecture were installed by the Neo Empire team.

The machines were not equipped with the IC Card feature, and obviously not connected on the NESYS infrastructure, but this still represented the largest placement of SFIV machines outside of Japan.

On average cues of over 20 eager players filled the hall where they were located and grew as the day continued. As this report is filed the two day Battle of Destiny event is continuing – visited on a steamy Saturday in London, it is expected that the Sunday opening is breaking all records on attendance.

This was a major event, with players rushing to re-join the cue once played. The games were limited to only three bouts as winner, players having to be prized off the cabinets. Copious amounts of video was being taken soon to fill the web, and all of the aspects of this latest game code build will soon make the UK gamers the most up-to-date on the game.

These six machines are expected to be given another airing in the European player scene, but at the moment there is no plan for a proper ROI test in a arcade (though the Stinger can reveal that heated communication with possible distributors was still ongoing) – the hardware being shown more as a marketing tool for the coming consumer release than as a serious amusement opportunity.

For some of that video, check this out (by user Smoothyworld):

It’s great to hear that the tournament was a success and that it provided an opportunity for players to get their hands on the game instead of just the press. Still, as The Stinger discusses in the last paragraph it appears that the arcade units continue to be used more for a marketing tool for the console versions rather than for the arcade version itself, and that is a shame that we’re not going to quickly forget.

[The Stinger Report] [Discuss on the Forum]

SFIV & “The Battle of Destiny: Road to Evolution” Tournament in the UK

July 27, 2008

A big tournament, known as The Battle Of Destiny: Road to Evolution (the title almost sounds like something from an old rock album) recently took place in the UK, and The Stinger Report was there to scope out how things went. From The Stinger:

The UK Capital played host to what must be the largest gathering of Street Fighter IV machines seen outside of Japan.

At the ‘Battle of Destiny: Road to Evolution’ – the first organized event of its kind, held at the London Metropolitan University student halls.

The whole event organized by the Neo Empire team [Image 0162], the number one fighting games community. Established in 2005 the community has proven a strong ‘Play-Power’ community able in this case to move mountains.

Beyond the showing of the SFIV machines, a large number of console machines were in operation playing the latest and greatest fighting games. This major tournament was held linked with a number of championship play offs, with the winner sent to the EVO2008 Championship series in Las Vegas

The main event for The Stinger however was the appearance of the Street Fighter machines. The event supported by Capcom Europe, and by their PR Manager Leo Tan [Image 313]. To date only a small band of UK media had seen two SFIV machines that had been based in a locked room at Capcom’s London HQ – now the players had their chance.

For the first time for the UK playing public six Street Fighter IV cabinets where placed on free-play for a hoard of eager fingers. Hot-off the boat the ‘Vewlix’ cabinets running the Taito Type-X² architecture were installed by the Neo Empire team.

The machines were not equipped with the IC Card feature, and obviously not connected on the NESYS infrastructure, but this still represented the largest placement of SFIV machines outside of Japan.

On average cues of over 20 eager players filled the hall where they were located and grew as the day continued. As this report is filed the two day Battle of Destiny event is continuing – visited on a steamy Saturday in London, it is expected that the Sunday opening is breaking all records on attendance.

This was a major event, with players rushing to re-join the cue once played. The games were limited to only three bouts as winner, players having to be prized off the cabinets. Copious amounts of video was being taken soon to fill the web, and all of the aspects of this latest game code build will soon make the UK gamers the most up-to-date on the game.

These six machines are expected to be given another airing in the European player scene, but at the moment there is no plan for a proper ROI test in a arcade (though the Stinger can reveal that heated communication with possible distributors was still ongoing) – the hardware being shown more as a marketing tool for the coming consumer release than as a serious amusement opportunity.

For some of that video, check this out (by user Smoothyworld):

It’s great to hear that the tournament was a success and that it provided an opportunity for players to get their hands on the game instead of just the press. Still, as The Stinger discusses in the last paragraph it appears that the arcade units continue to be used more for a marketing tool for the console versions rather than for the arcade version itself, and that is a shame that we’re not going to quickly forget.

[The Stinger Report] [Discuss on the Forum]