Archive for September 14, 2010

Super Street Fighter IV Arcade gets a price tag

September 14, 2010

It wasn’t long ago that we heard that Super Street Fighter IV would be getting a December release. Now we have a price tag to chew on as AM-Net reveals the following about the kit:

HDDROMKIT4セット\1,912,000(税別) Set HDDROMKIT4 \ 1,912,000 (U.S.)

In a currency converter, 1,912,000 in yen is around $23,000USD. That can’t be for a single kit – you might recall that the first SFIV Arcade was sold in packages of four complete cabinets for around $40,000 and the HDDROMKIT4 seems to indicate that these kits are being sold in fours as well. That would put the kits individually around $6000USD per unit and of course for an operator to get a 2 player setup going they have to purchase two since Capcom seems to think that the VS. configuration is perfect for everyone. I’m sure SSFIV will sell to those who already plunked down a several grand to get SFIV Arcade the first time around, assuming they still have the funds for such a purchase but I have a hard time believing that Capcom will really obtain sales on the scale of thousands that they are looking for at such a price. What would make far more sense is to A) offer a decent price for the game and make a build for 2p on 1 cabinet(ex. the new Blazblue is going for a little over $2k per kit) or B) offer the game on NESiCAxLIVE for a download, which eliminates the costs of hardware that SFIV operators have already invested in(it’s all running on the Type X2) and it could be sold at a reasonable price that many more could afford. Seeing how several other fighters are being made available on NESiCA including Blazblue Continuum Shift II, KOF98 Ultimate Match, Samurai Spirits Sen, Battle Fantasia, and KOF Maximum Impact Reg. A, it’s not like SSFIV should be out of the question. Then again I have heard that NESiCA will charge a small fee per game (like CoinUp does on Big Buck online games) which will increase the cost of each play which can be a hindrance on the users end depending upon the price per credit. Of course there is always C), which is available now – get a Game Gate VU and purchase a copy of SSFIV for the 360 or PS3 and you get a 2 player arcade setup for much less.

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Promoting indie games with an arcade cabinet

September 14, 2010

Newsfeed 924 via

At the Penny Arcade Expo we saw how a few companies decide to give their games an extra edge by putting their console game into an arcade cabinet. The games which were showcased in such cabinets probably won’t ever see an official release but the understanding that an arcade cabinet attracts attention in a way that a standard kiosk setup does not was certainly highlighted. Now the same idea has moved over to the indie games scene where a small group of independent game developers found a way to grab some attention towards their games at the Fan Expo in Toronto. By using an old arcade cabinet, they converted it to play a number of indie games that were brought to the show and as a result it helped give those games some extra attention them might not have received otherwise. As it turned out, the indie developers got a taste of what an arcade location test can be like, which is different than putting out something like a public online beta. Maybe one of them will consider making an indie arcade title, although that can be a whole new challenge in itself as not everyone makes it there either since you need a way to get the game out there which involves selling hardware in addition to software and that takes funding.

Which takes us on a tangent for a moment, this is where something like Taito’s NESiCAxLIVE digital distribution system could prove useful. It does limit what could be done with the controls which are often one way arcades stand out on their own but it would save a developer from having to build a cabinet, I/O board, PCB and all of that to sell.  There are still issues that would need to be resolved for that idea to work everywhere (Taito has the advantage in Japan of having a standard cabinet like Vewlix and clones/variations on that) but I think that something like it could be done elsewhere. Make something like the Neo Geo or Atomiswave, with a standardized cabinet, modular control panels and standard hardware that connects to a robust online delivery system and you could create a new dynamic in the market, which is why I think NESiCA can be a revolution for this industry.

Anyways getting back to the indie games, you can read more about how that event went @ Ars Technica